Discussion:
Another attack on live music - Please Help
(too old to reply)
FootBlockFTW
2007-04-22 22:10:43 UTC
Permalink
Hysteria is one of Auckland's (New Zealand) LAST venues not only for
live rock, metal and punk music, but one of the last bars to play ANY
bands with original music. The Auckland City Council is acting in an
unjust manner (in the opinion of many). I Beg of you, no matter where
in the world you live, please help us save Hysteria. http://www.savehysteria.co.nz/.
Please read the link, then if you feel it is a worthy cause, sign the
petition online.
JoeSpareBedroom
2007-04-23 11:11:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by FootBlockFTW
Hysteria is one of Auckland's (New Zealand) LAST venues not only for
live rock, metal and punk music, but one of the last bars to play ANY
bands with original music. The Auckland City Council is acting in an
unjust manner (in the opinion of many). I Beg of you, no matter where
in the world you live, please help us save Hysteria.
http://www.savehysteria.co.nz/.
Please read the link, then if you feel it is a worthy cause, sign the
petition online.
Thoughts and questions:

- Do local ordinances define the noise level using actual numbers, as in
decibels? If yes, has the noise been measured and found to comply (or not)?

- Are there other issues causing problems in the neighborhood? Trash left on
the streets by customers, especially when they leave at night? Broken
bottles, etc? Parking problems? Non-music noise late at night, in nearby
residential streets? Fact: Some people don't know how to keep their voices
down and their car radios off at 2:00 AM when all the houses nearby are
dark.

- Does the club own the property, or rent/lease it from someone else?

- What do you know about each and every member of the city council? Which of
them stands to benefit personally from the club being closed, and the
property becoming available to a new business? Remember that any time
politicians do something that *seems* stupid or illogical, it's usually
because they will make money by doing so. For instance, are any of the
council members in the restaurant business? Real estate business?
Construction? If not in any of those businesses themselves, it may help to
know if any of their family members are connected in those ways. Simply
asking might be enough to put a stop to this action.
Derek Tearne
2007-04-23 12:10:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- Do local ordinances define the noise level using actual numbers, as in
decibels? If yes, has the noise been measured and found to comply (or not)?
Well, there's noise levels to comply with, but unfortunately complaints
carry a lot of weight regardless of the actual noise level. You can
have acoustic trios playing in your cafe, but if there are enough
regular complaints you'll get shut down. That's the root of the problem
- and the regulations and zones haven't changed well enough with the
rapidly changing state of Auckland.

Although it's a sad thing to lose another venue for live music,
considering the location of the club it's not in the least bit
surprising. Apartment blocks have been sprouting up like weeds around
the upper queen street/K'road area and, although on some levels K'rd is
the spiritual home of alternative music, I can't imagine the owners have
failed to see the writing on the wall.
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- What do you know about each and every member of the city council? Which of
them stands to benefit personally from the club being closed, and the
property becoming available to a new business?
At the moment we have the most arts friendly city council of any time in
the last 20 years. Our mayor actually turns up at arts events,
including somewhat fringe musical events. Sometimes he looks rather
bemused, but he's there, and supportive. Our prime minister is also
arts friendly, and has been spotted with her fingers in her ears when
we've played at events she's been attending (we must be getting better
though, as she stayed through a half hour set last time).

Unfortunately we also have a rash of inner city apartments, and it's the
developers (who never sound proof them enough) and those lobby interests
which get in the way. It's a supreme irony that many of these
apartments are sold to people with the idea that they can be right next
to the pumping heart of the city, and once they move in the residents
complain bitterly at how loud that heart beats.

The council have, in fact, started trying to implement and enforce a
development plan that is skewed against these horrendous apartment
blocks - but it's too little and too late.

A heavy metal and punk venue on K'Road - personally I'm surprised
they've managed to stay open as long as they have.
--
Derek Tearne - ***@url.co.nz
Many Hands - Trans Cultural Music from Aotearoa/New Zealand
http://www.manyhands.co.nz/
JoeSpareBedroom
2007-04-23 12:15:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Tearne
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- Do local ordinances define the noise level using actual numbers, as in
decibels? If yes, has the noise been measured and found to comply (or not)?
Well, there's noise levels to comply with, but unfortunately complaints
carry a lot of weight regardless of the actual noise level. You can
have acoustic trios playing in your cafe, but if there are enough
regular complaints you'll get shut down. That's the root of the problem
- and the regulations and zones haven't changed well enough with the
rapidly changing state of Auckland.
Although it's a sad thing to lose another venue for live music,
considering the location of the club it's not in the least bit
surprising. Apartment blocks have been sprouting up like weeds around
the upper queen street/K'road area and, although on some levels K'rd is
the spiritual home of alternative music, I can't imagine the owners have
failed to see the writing on the wall.
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- What do you know about each and every member of the city council? Which of
them stands to benefit personally from the club being closed, and the
property becoming available to a new business?
At the moment we have the most arts friendly city council of any time in
the last 20 years. Our mayor actually turns up at arts events,
including somewhat fringe musical events. Sometimes he looks rather
bemused, but he's there, and supportive. Our prime minister is also
arts friendly, and has been spotted with her fingers in her ears when
we've played at events she's been attending (we must be getting better
though, as she stayed through a half hour set last time).
Unfortunately we also have a rash of inner city apartments, and it's the
developers (who never sound proof them enough) and those lobby interests
which get in the way. It's a supreme irony that many of these
apartments are sold to people with the idea that they can be right next
to the pumping heart of the city, and once they move in the residents
complain bitterly at how loud that heart beats.
The council have, in fact, started trying to implement and enforce a
development plan that is skewed against these horrendous apartment
blocks - but it's too little and too late.
A heavy metal and punk venue on K'Road - personally I'm surprised
they've managed to stay open as long as they have.
Here in the states, it's not uncommon for local governments to provide
incentives to keep local businesses from leaving, or to attract new ones.
Usually, the manufacturing sector is the recipient of these incentives (tax
breaks, etc). I wonder if the arts-friendly council could find some way of
helping the club deal with the expense of installing state of the art
soundproofing.
Don Evans
2007-04-23 20:34:32 UTC
Permalink
<<snip>>
It's a supreme irony that many of
these apartments are sold to people with the idea that they can be
right next to the pumping heart of the city, and once they move in
the residents complain bitterly at how loud that heart beats.
Nice turn of a phrase, there!

Don
<<snip>>
js
2007-04-23 18:13:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Tearne
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Derek Tearne
Unfortunately we also have a rash of inner city apartments, and it's the
developers (who never sound proof them enough) and those lobby interests
which get in the way. It's a supreme irony that many of these
apartments are sold to people with the idea that they can be right next
to the pumping heart of the city, and once they move in the residents
complain bitterly at how loud that heart beats.<<<



Bingo. We have a winner.

In my city we had two seedy parts of town that were also great club/arts
districts. In the first case, Mostly white, upper middle class Yuppies were
buying dilapidated homes on the edge of the ghetto, at the same time as
businesses were buying dilapidated commercial buildings and creating a funky
arts district. The Yuppie neighbors SHRIEKED to the city council at the
slightest hint of noise or traffic, and more than a few of the business shut
down.

AFAIK now, there is an uneasy truce between the steadily gentrifying
neighborhood and the businesses that are left. They recently bulldozed the
projects down the street to make way for more Yuppie housing - probably hi
tech apts made to LOOK like the projects. I can't see many of those business
lasting 5 more years.


In the second, a genuine arts district rose all by itself in the middle of
an industrial district in the ghetto. For many years, it was THE place to go
for arts and culture in the city, attracting all sorts of people.

Again, the Yupsters decided to "gentrify" the neighborhood. So they
demolished entire city blocks of , and built buildings that just LOOK old
and dilapidated.

They also managed to get a noise ordinance with a lower dB threshold - not
coincidentally, the same threshold emanating from the clubs who refused to
sell to the developers. Guess who won?

So now, there are some good clubs there, and cool shops, but what with the J
Crew Yuppies and their strollers and whatnot, the place is getting that
Disney-esque "Alternative World" feel which that crowd loves - they want to
be "cool", but they don't want to get their hands dirty - literally or
figuratively.

I guess that answers your question.

Don't feel too bad - this pattern repeats itself in arts areas all over the
world, including the major cities (especially the major cities). What
usually happens is that there is a downtime of a few years, followed by the
re-emergence of the artists in an even more run down area, followed by the
cool people, followed by the Yuppies and the speculators who jack up the
rents and destroy what made the place great, the artists leave -rinse and
repeat.

So it goes.
--
Check out my band, West Eats Meat http://www.myspace.com/westeatsmeat

My Homepage, Back By Popular Demand: http://www.jmsjazz.com

"I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it
comes out."

- Bill Hicks
Post by Derek Tearne
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- Do local ordinances define the noise level using actual numbers, as in
decibels? If yes, has the noise been measured and found to comply (or not)?
Well, there's noise levels to comply with, but unfortunately complaints
carry a lot of weight regardless of the actual noise level. You can
have acoustic trios playing in your cafe, but if there are enough
regular complaints you'll get shut down. That's the root of the problem
- and the regulations and zones haven't changed well enough with the
rapidly changing state of Auckland.
Although it's a sad thing to lose another venue for live music,
considering the location of the club it's not in the least bit
surprising. Apartment blocks have been sprouting up like weeds around
the upper queen street/K'road area and, although on some levels K'rd is
the spiritual home of alternative music, I can't imagine the owners have
failed to see the writing on the wall.
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
- What do you know about each and every member of the city council? Which of
them stands to benefit personally from the club being closed, and the
property becoming available to a new business?
At the moment we have the most arts friendly city council of any time in
the last 20 years. Our mayor actually turns up at arts events,
including somewhat fringe musical events. Sometimes he looks rather
bemused, but he's there, and supportive. Our prime minister is also
arts friendly, and has been spotted with her fingers in her ears when
we've played at events she's been attending (we must be getting better
though, as she stayed through a half hour set last time).
Unfortunately we also have a rash of inner city apartments, and it's the
developers (who never sound proof them enough) and those lobby interests
which get in the way. It's a supreme irony that many of these
apartments are sold to people with the idea that they can be right next
to the pumping heart of the city, and once they move in the residents
complain bitterly at how loud that heart beats.
The council have, in fact, started trying to implement and enforce a
development plan that is skewed against these horrendous apartment
blocks - but it's too little and too late.
A heavy metal and punk venue on K'Road - personally I'm surprised
they've managed to stay open as long as they have.
--
Many Hands - Trans Cultural Music from Aotearoa/New Zealand
http://www.manyhands.co.nz/
Brian Running
2007-04-23 18:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by js
In my city we had two seedy parts of town that were also great club/arts
districts. In the first case, Mostly white, upper middle class Yuppies were
buying dilapidated homes on the edge of the ghetto, at the same time as
businesses were buying dilapidated commercial buildings and creating a funky
arts district. The Yuppie neighbors SHRIEKED to the city council at the
slightest hint of noise or traffic, and more than a few of the business shut
down.
They're doing the same thing out on the fringes of the city, too. They
all want to live in the country, but when they get there, they find
things like hog farms, gun clubs, motocross tracks, and private property
on which people like to do all sorts of unruly, noisy, smelly things.
How gauche! So, they start petition drives, they bring lawsuits, they
write letters to the editor, they get in a big, huffy dither about the
real world encroaching on their vision of life in the country. They
pass ordinances banning activities that had gone on for almost two
hundred years previously as a matter of day-to-day life. Then, too, the
first ones to arrive fight to prevent any others from following in their
steps. They vote to create 5-, 10- even 30-acre minimum lot sizes in
their towns, to prevent the lower classes from being able to have their
little piece of the country, too. And then, on top of all that, they
destroy every trace of nature on their properties, by having 5 acres of
mowed lawn with six-times-a-year applications of fertilizers, pesticides
and herbicides, and by paving over the remaining land to have tennis
courts. They dig artificial lakes where wetlands had once been, so they
can water-ski without interruption from the lower classes in their
fishing boats and canoes. Once all that's accomplished, they feel they
can justify having their 6500-pound SUVs, because they "live in the
country."

You gotta hand it to human race...
Geetar Dave
2007-04-23 18:49:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by js
Don't feel too bad - this pattern repeats itself in arts areas all over the
world, including the major cities (especially the major cities). What
usually happens is that there is a downtime of a few years, followed by the
re-emergence of the artists in an even more run down area, followed by the
cool people, followed by the Yuppies and the speculators who jack up the
rents and destroy what made the place great, the artists leave -rinse and
repeat.
In Cincinnati, it works differently. All that is hip and cool
eventually leaves the downtown area, and goes across the river to
Northern KY.

-dave-----:::
www.myspace.com/geetardave
dugjustdug
2007-04-23 20:12:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by js
Bingo. We have a winner.
Nicely penned (typed?), js. It is the natural progression of things.
In my neck o' the woods, the larger towns downtown core was moving to
the outskirts, yet, there were a few who still wanted any thriving
nightlife snuffed out. They shot themselves in the foot financially
from it and that has been 10 years ago now.

A couple of the outlying communities decided to pick up the various
live venue traffic and, through smart club management and a goof
relationship with the police and sherriff offices, they have managed
to thrive ever since. Now that the mood on the larger downtown is
changing, they are still finding it hard to steal from what the
outlying communities took on.

Good for them!
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