Discussion:
Who started this "vox" thing?
(too old to reply)
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 19:46:04 UTC
Permalink
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
handgunner
2010-01-03 20:03:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
I think Bono did it.
Benj
2010-01-03 20:44:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by handgunner
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
I think Bono did it.
Oh man! I don't know which is worse. Uneducated "educated" libs like
JoeSpare or Cretin wingers like handgunner. :)

Boys, the word is Latin. It means "voice". It's been used in music
like, well, since the Roman Empire. Probably the most commonly known
usage is "vox humana" for a certain organ stop (which actually doesn't
much sound like a human voice). One utility of "vox" as someone
pointed out is that it only takes three letters.

OK?
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 20:50:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by handgunner
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
I think Bono did it.
Oh man! I don't know which is worse. Uneducated "educated" libs like
JoeSpare or Cretin wingers like handgunner. :)

Boys, the word is Latin. It means "voice". It's been used in music
like, well, since the Roman Empire. Probably the most commonly known
usage is "vox humana" for a certain organ stop (which actually doesn't
much sound like a human voice). One utility of "vox" as someone
pointed out is that it only takes three letters.

OK?

=============

OK, but the word is tossed around a lot by fellas like this, who don't look
like Latin scholars. :-)

http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=118
Toby Gray
2010-01-03 22:59:30 UTC
Permalink
Definitely Latin. You folks didn't take Latin in Jr High? VOX is also
smaller to write on a piece of tape below a mixing board channel than
VOCALS

Let's think about:

A capella. [ah kah-peh-lah] (Italian) Literally, "in the chapel."
Choral music sung without instrumental accompaniment.

Adagio/Adagietto. [ah-dah-jee-oh; ah dah-jee-eh-toh] (Italian)
"Slowly." Indicates a slow tempo . Adagietto is also a slow tempo, but
not as slow as adagio.

Allegro/Allegretto. [ah-lay-groh; ah-lay-greh-toh] (Italian) "Merry,"
"cheerful." Indicates a fast tempo . Allegretto is slightly slower
than allegro and implies a lighter style.

Andante/Andantino. [ahn-dahn-tay; ahn-dahn-tee-noh] (Italian) From the
verb andare, "to walk." Implies a moderate, "walking" tempo.
Similarly, andantino (the diminuitive of andante) could imply a tempo
either faster or slower than andante.

Animato. [ah-nee-mah-toh] (Italian) "Animated." Tempo indication,
generally modifying an initial tempo. For example, piu animato means
"more animated than before."

Antiphonal. Music performed by an ensemble divided into two or more
distinct groups which perform in alternation and together.

Aria. [ah-ree-ah] (Italian) "Air." A self-contained, melodic section
of a large-scale vocal work (opera , cantata, or oratorio) sung by a
soloist with instrumental or orchestral accompaniment. It is distinct
from the more speech-like recitative sections. There are also arias
that exist independent of any larger work, and in the Baroque period,
some instrumental works were called arias, such as the theme of Bach's
Goldberg Variations.

Arioso. [ah-ree-oh-soh] Sometimes used to identify vocal or
instrumental music in a lyrical style.

Arpeggio. [ahr-peh-jee-oh] (Italian) From "arpa" (harp). Playing the
notes of a chord in succession, instead of simultaneously.

Bar. Synonymous with measure. A way of dividing music into small,
often regularly spaced groups of beats. The division is indicated by a
vertical line, called the bar-line.

Cadence. The ending of a musical phrase, and the common melodic or
harmonic formulas that make the ear recognize such an ending.

Cadenza. [kah-dehn-zah] (Italian) "cadence." A virtuoso passage
usually found near the end of a concerto movement or vocal aria .
Cadenzas are often based on the themes of the piece in which they
appear and are improvisatory in style. In the Classical and Romantic
periods performers were expected to improvise or provide their own
cadenzas, although Mozart began the practice of providing written
cadenzas for some of his piano concertos.

Canon. (Latin) "Rule." The strictest form of counterpoint. After the
initial statement of a melody in one "voice," all subsequent "voices"
must imitate that melody exactly (note for note), or with only minimal
adjustments. The melody must be composed so that it sounds "correct"
when played "against" itself. The imitatations may begin on the same
pitch, or on another pitch (in which case all the notes will have to
be "transposed" to maintain the integrity of the melody). Canons are
usually part of larger works; perhaps the most renowned collection of
canons is contained in J.S. Bach's Musical Offering. "Row, Row, your
Boat" is a familiar example of a simple canon.

Cantabile. [kahn-tah-bee-lay] (Italian) "Singing." Music performed in
a singing style. The term can be added to a tempo marking (andante
cantabile, for example) or placed over a melodic line.

Chord. The simultaneous sounding of three or more notes.

Chromatic. From the Greek "chromatikos" (colored). The chromatic scale
divides an octave into twelve semitones (all the white and black notes
on the keyboard from middle c to the c above it, for example), as
opposed to the diatonic major and minor scales. Chromatic chords
employ notes foreign to the diatonic scale of the prevailing key in a
musical passage. The history of Western Music through the early 20th
century reveals a progression of increasing chromaticism.

Coda. [koh-dah] (Italian) "Tail." The last section of a piece of
music.

Consonance. The simultaneous sounding of two or more tones which
produce an effect of stability or harmoniousness. Exactly which
combinations of tones are considered consonant varies considerably
among different cultures and has changed considerably during the
history of Western music. Definitions of consonance may also be found
in acoustical theories from Pythagoras to Helmholtz. Intervals (the
distance from one note to another] considered consonant in the common
practice of tonal music are unisons, octaves, perfect fifths and
fourths, and both major and minor sixths.

Counterpoint. The art of combining two or more musical lines that are
to be played or sung simultaneously. These lines may be said to be "in
counterpoint" with each other. The term is in some ways synonymous
with polyphony, although counterpoint is most commonly used for
Baroque music; polyphony for music from the Medieval and Renaissance
periods. The rules of counterpoint were codified from the music of
Palestrina by J.J. Fux in his 1725 treatise, Gradus ad Parnassum
(Steps to Parnassus).

Crescendo. [kreh-shen-doh] (Italian) "Growing." Indicates a gradual
increase in volume. May be indicated by a symbol called a
"hairpin" (<) or abbreviated as "cresc."

Diatonic. Any octave divided into a seven-note scale (consisting of
various combinations of whole tones and semitones). The major and
minor scales, as well as the church modes, are diatonic. Diatonic
harmony, which is the basis for our tonal system, consists of chords
which contain only the notes of a given diatonic scale. (See
chromatic.)

Diminuendo. [deh-meen-yoo-ehn-doh] (Italian) "Diminishing." Indicates
a gradual decrease in volume. Synonymous with decrescendo. May be
indicated by a symbol called a "hairpin" (>) or abbreviated as "dim."

Dissonance. The sounding of two or more tones which produce an effect
of harshness or instability, and demand "resolution" to a consonance.
Like consonance, the concept of dissonance is dependent upon both
context and the way our ears have been cultured. Some intervals
considered dissonant in the Medieval period were found to be consonant
during the Renaissance. Also, the way a dissonance is resolved (and
even the way it is orchestrated) can decrease or intensify how "harsh"
it sounds. Intervals commonly considered dissonant in tonal music are
the major and minor seconds and sevenths.

Drone. A sustained musical sound, usually a bass note or notes. Also,
an instrument or part of an instrument that produces such sounds can
be called a drone, such as the drones of a bagpipe.

Dynamics. The degrees of volume (loudness and softness) in music. Also
the words, abbreviations, and symbols used to indicate degrees of
volume. Piano (soft) and forte (loud) are most common.

Harmony. Harmony is the chordal or vertical structure of a piece of
music, as opposed to melody (and polyphony, or multiple melodies)
which represents the horizontal structure. The succession of chords in
a given piece is referred to as a chord progression.

Homophony (homophonic). From the Greek for "like-sounding." Music in
which all voices move in the same rhythm. Or, more commonly, a musical
texture in which there is a clear distinction between melody and a
chordal [chord] accompaniment. (See polyphony.)

Imitation. The overlapping repetition of a melody by two or more
"voices." A technique of polyphonic composition.

Key. A musical work in a "key" is melodically and harmonically
orientated around a particular major or minor scale. For example, a
composition in C Major will usually begin and end in that key,
although excursions to other keys may occur. However, a passage in C
Major may temporarily utilize notes that do not occur in that scale
and still remain in C Major.

Key signature. The key signature is a symbol found at the beginning of
a musical composition; sharps or flats are placed on the staff as
needed to indicate the key of the piece.

Largo. [lahr-goh] (Italian) "Broad." Indicates a very slow tempo,
usually slower than adagio.

Legato. [leh-gah-toh] (Italian) "Tied." An indication to play music in
a connected, smooth fashion.

Libretto. [lih-breh-toh] (Italian) "Little book." The text of an
opera, oratorio, or other large-scale vocal work.

Measure. Synonymous with bar.

Meter. The organization of beats, establishing an underlying pattern
of emphases and creating a regular, measurable "pulse." A waltz for
example, is in a triple meter, with an emphasis on the first beat of
the three: 1-2-3, 1-2-3. A time signature placed at the beginning of a
composition or section indicates the basic unit of measurement
contained within each measure. A waltz is usually notated in three-
quarter (3/4) time, for example, which tells the performer that each
measure will contain three quarter notes to be played as fast as the
tempo indicates. The first beat of a group is generally emphasized. A
beat should not be confused with a note; a beat may contain one note,
many notes, or may be silent (indicated by a symbol called a rest).
Beats create an underlying pulse that organizes musical sounds through
time.

Mode. In the broadest meaning, any arrangement of musical tones into a
scale. The major and minor scales can be called modes. Mode most often
refers to the scales used in Western music from about 400 to 1500
which were identified by Greek names: Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian,
Mixolydian. These are sometimes called the "church modes," because of
their associations with Gregorian Chant. Two subsequent additions to
this old modal system, Ionian and Aeolian, were identical to the major
and minor scales known today. By 1600 these were the only two modes
commonly used by classical composers, but the other modes continued to
be heard in folk traditions. The church modes were rediscovered by
composers of the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries ; the modes
also play in important role in jazz composition.

Modulation. Changing key within the course of a composition.

Monophony (monophonic). From the Greek for "one-sounding." Music for a
single voice or part; a melody without any accompaniment. Gregorian
chant is an example of monophony.

Motive. A recurring, recognizable rhythmic, melodic, or harmonic idea.
A motive may also be a part of a larger phrase, theme, or melody.

Ornament. An embellishment to a pre-existing melodic line, generally
consisting of a single note, or small group of notes. At various times
musical history the use of ornaments has been left up to the
discretion of the performer, indicated either by a system of symbolic
shorthand, or written out as notes.

Ostinato. [oh-steh-nah-toh] (Italian) "Obstinate." A musical pattern
repeated many times, one after another. The pattern may be melodic,
harmonic, or rhythmic. A melodic ostinato repeated in the bass is
called a ground bass.

Part. 1. The line or lines of music read by an individual performer or
multiple performers of the same instrument. For example, the viola
section of an orchestra consists of a group of violists reading the
same music, known as the"viola part." 2. A single melodic strand of a
polyphonic or contrapuntal texture, as in "two-part counterpoint" and
"four-part harmony." In this context, "voice" can also be used to mean
"part." 3. A section of a larger composition, used primarily to
describe a musical form, for example "three-part song form."

Phrase. A sub-section of a melodic line, generally longer than a
motive, and comparable to a clause or sentence within a paragraph of
written prose. Melodies and themes may be constructed out of several
phrases of equal or varied length.

Pizzicato. [pih-tzee-kah-toh] (Italian) "Plucked." An indication to
pluck (with the fingers) the string or strings of an instrument which
is usually bowed.

Polyphony (polyphonic). From the Greek for "many-sounding." Music in
which two or more "voices" are heard simultaneously; as opposed to
monophonic ("one-sounding") and homophonic ("like-sounding"). See
counterpoint.

Recitative. [reh-sih-tah-teev] From the Italian "recitativo." A
declamatory style of singing designed to imitate the natural
inflections of speech. It was developed by a group of Florentine
intellectuals (c.1600) in an attempt to recreate the performance style
of ancient Greek tragedy, and became an essential feature of operas
and oratorios. In early Baroque operas, [cons/genres] the distinction
between recitative and aria was often blurred; by the late Baroque (c.
1700) the two were completely distinct in style and purpose, with
recitative used to propel the plot and aria used for poetic
reflection. In the Romantic period the lines between the two forms
began to blur again. Baroque and Classical opera featured two types of
recitative: recitativo secco ("dry recitative") featuring quick
articulation of the text, accompanied by harpsichord; and recitativo
accompagnato ("accompanied recitative"), more dramatic and melodic,
accompanied by the full orchestra

Rubato. [roo-bah-toh] (Italian) "Robbed." Also tempo rubato ("robbed
time"). The practice of performing music in a flexible, instead of
strict tempo. Rubato is one of the more controversial issues in
musical performance, as its precise manner of execution cannot be
precisely notated. However, the "appropriate" application of rubato is
often considered to be a sign of the "musicality" of a performer. What
sounds like "musical" rubato to one listener may sound overdone and
distorted by another.

Staccato. [stah-kah-toh] (Italian) "Separated." Notes which are held
for less than their written value, or "separated" from one another.
There are various degrees of staccato, and it can be notated in
various ways; the most common has a dot placed over or under the note.
Notes written to be played staccato are often played in a pointed or
spiky manner.

Syncopation. An alteration of the expected rhythmic emphases: for
example, accenting a weak (instead of a strong) beat, or replacing
strong beats with a rest (silence). Syncopations disturb the regular,
predictable pattern of strong and weak beats. (See meter.)

Tempo. [tehm-poh] (Italian) "Time." The rate of speed at which a
musical composition is performed. Tempo is indicated by a tempo
marking (usually in Italian), which describes the general speed (and
often the mood) of a piece or section. Allegro, andante and adagio are
common tempo markings.

Theme. A musical idea on which all or part of a work may be based. The
theme is usually a melody or melodic fragment. A single theme may be
used as the basis for a set of variations. Most music is made up of at
least several different themes.

Timbre. [tam-bruh] Synonymous with tone color. The acoustical
properties of a specific instrument or voice which contribute to its
distinctive sound. For example, a flute has a different timbre than a
clarinet.

Tonality. Denotes the presence of a central key in a musical
composition. If the music moves to a different key (see modulation),
it is expected to return to the original key (called the tonic).
Tonality gives the ear a "center," providing a context in which melody
and harmony have "meaning." Atonality (prevalent in some 20th century
music) is music without any central key.

Tone. 1. Any stable sound; synonymous with pitch. 2. A quality of
sound, dependent in many ways on personal taste. For example, a person
may find a particular singer's tone to be beautiful, another may find
that same singer's tone to be unpleasant. 3. The mood of a musical
composition, similar to the use of the term in descriptions of
literature.

Trio. 1. A piece of music for three musicians (instrumentalists or
singers). 2. A contrasting middle section of a minuet, scherzo, or
similar piece.

Vibrato. [vih-brah-toh] (Italian) "vibrated." A slight fluctuation of
pitch on a sustained tone. String players produce vibrato by wiggling
the left hand back and forth (the right hand holds the bow); wind
players and singers use breath control. Judicious use of vibrato is
considered to be expressive. Excessive vibrato produces what is often
described euphamistically as a wobble.

Vivace. [vih-vah-chay] (Italian) "full of life," "flourishing,"
"vivacious." More an indication of mood than of tempo. It was often
used to modify a tempo indication, such as Allegro vivace ("Fast and
vivacious").

and then pick up a copy of the Harvard Dictionary of Music....
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 23:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Toby Gray
Definitely Latin. You folks didn't take Latin in Jr High? VOX is also
smaller to write on a piece of tape below a mixing board channel than
VOCALS
I **KNOW** it's Latin. That's not my question.
bassman2
2010-01-03 23:30:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Toby Gray
Definitely Latin. You folks didn't take Latin in Jr High? VOX is also
smaller to write on a piece of tape below a mixing board channel than
VOCALS
I **KNOW** it's Latin. That's not my question.
I think it is one of those things that become "main stream" as
languages evolve, Joe - for example, a few years ago, you would never
have heard of terms such as

crunk
n. a type of hip-hop or rap music characterized by repeated shouted
catchphrases and elements typical of electronic dance music, such as
prominent bass.

It's a bit like trying to find the origin of a good joke, I guess,
there is never an "exact" source..
Bob Sherunckle
2010-01-05 17:25:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Toby Gray
Definitely Latin. You folks didn't take Latin in Jr High? VOX is also
smaller to write on a piece of tape below a mixing board channel than
VOCALS
I **KNOW** it's Latin. That's not my question.
I think it is one of those things that become "main stream" as
languages evolve, Joe - for example, a few years ago, you would never
have heard of terms such as

crunk
n. a type of hip-hop or rap music characterized by repeated shouted
catchphrases and elements typical of electronic dance music, such as
prominent bass.

It's a bit like trying to find the origin of a good joke, I guess,
there is never an "exact" source..

************

What about fongerboad then ?
bassman2
2010-01-05 20:25:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Sherunckle
What about fongerboad then ?
Good question (!)...Reference this (Source:
http://www.axecentral.com/fender-custom-shop-jazz-bass-review-663768.html)

Neck: Maple, satin finish, C shape, quartersawn
Fongerboad: East Indian rosewood, block inlays, NO binding

Might I say some "poetic" license has been added here,,:-)))
Benj
2010-01-07 08:00:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Sherunckle
What about fongerboad then ?
Good question (!)...Reference this (Source:http://www.axecentral.com/fender-custom-shop-jazz-bass-review-663768....)
Neck: Maple, satin finish, C shape, quartersawn
Fongerboad: East Indian rosewood, block inlays, NO binding
Might I say some "poetic" license has been added here,,:-)))
Oh Man! I love this! I've never seen fongerboad outside our little
world before. I love it. It's the fun equivalent of happening upon
some emergency vehicle with an alt.tasteless "Save the Choad"
bumpersticker. We should all live long enough to see that day! :-)
Golem
2010-01-07 17:07:06 UTC
Permalink
Odd thing, personally ...

Even tho I'm aware of the Latin, and the
"Vox Humana" organ stop, etc etc, I've
never thought of the general use of "vox"
in music jargon as a sign that musicians
recycle classical language. I always saw
it as a slang short hand, like:

"Electronics > 'Tronics > Tronix"

so thus:

"Vocals > Voc's > Vox"

Also, I don't think of it as recent. Can't
remember a time without it, and I'm in
my 50's. IOW I would never ask "Who
started this FAD" as I see no fad there.
suds mcduff
2010-01-06 22:30:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Toby Gray
Definitely Latin. You folks didn't take Latin in Jr High? VOX is also
smaller to write on a piece of tape below a mixing board channel than
VOCALS
A capella. [ah kah-peh-lah] (Italian) Literally, "in the chapel."
Choral music sung without instrumental accompaniment.
Adagio/Adagietto. [ah-dah-jee-oh; ah dah-jee-eh-toh] (Italian)
"Slowly." Indicates a slow tempo . Adagietto is also a slow tempo, but
not as slow as adagio.
Allegro/Allegretto. [ah-lay-groh; ah-lay-greh-toh] (Italian) "Merry,"
"cheerful." Indicates a fast tempo . Allegretto is slightly slower
than allegro and implies a lighter style.
Andante/Andantino. [ahn-dahn-tay; ahn-dahn-tee-noh] (Italian) From the
verb andare, "to walk." Implies a moderate, "walking" tempo.
Similarly, andantino (the diminuitive of andante) could imply a tempo
either faster or slower than andante.
Animato. [ah-nee-mah-toh] (Italian) "Animated." Tempo indication,
generally modifying an initial tempo. For example, piu animato means
"more animated than before."
Antiphonal. Music performed by an ensemble divided into two or more
distinct groups which perform in alternation and together.
Aria. [ah-ree-ah] (Italian) "Air." A self-contained, melodic section
of a large-scale vocal work (opera , cantata, or oratorio) sung by a
soloist with instrumental or orchestral accompaniment. It is distinct
from the more speech-like recitative sections. There are also arias
that exist independent of any larger work, and in the Baroque period,
some instrumental works were called arias, such as the theme of Bach's
Goldberg Variations.
Arioso. [ah-ree-oh-soh] Sometimes used to identify vocal or
instrumental music in a lyrical style.
Arpeggio. [ahr-peh-jee-oh] (Italian) From "arpa" (harp). Playing the
notes of a chord in succession, instead of simultaneously.
Bar. Synonymous with measure. A way of dividing music into small,
often regularly spaced groups of beats. The division is indicated by a
vertical line, called the bar-line.
Cadence. The ending of a musical phrase, and the common melodic or
harmonic formulas that make the ear recognize such an ending.
Cadenza. [kah-dehn-zah] (Italian) "cadence." A virtuoso passage
usually found near the end of a concerto movement or vocal aria .
Cadenzas are often based on the themes of the piece in which they
appear and are improvisatory in style. In the Classical and Romantic
periods performers were expected to improvise or provide their own
cadenzas, although Mozart began the practice of providing written
cadenzas for some of his piano concertos.
Canon. (Latin) "Rule." The strictest form of counterpoint. After the
initial statement of a melody in one "voice," all subsequent "voices"
must imitate that melody exactly (note for note), or with only minimal
adjustments. The melody must be composed so that it sounds "correct"
when played "against" itself. The imitatations may begin on the same
pitch, or on another pitch (in which case all the notes will have to
be "transposed" to maintain the integrity of the melody). Canons are
usually part of larger works; perhaps the most renowned collection of
canons is contained in J.S. Bach's Musical Offering. "Row, Row, your
Boat" is a familiar example of a simple canon.
Cantabile. [kahn-tah-bee-lay] (Italian) "Singing." Music performed in
a singing style. The term can be added to a tempo marking (andante
cantabile, for example) or placed over a melodic line.
Chord. The simultaneous sounding of three or more notes.
Chromatic. From the Greek "chromatikos" (colored). The chromatic scale
divides an octave into twelve semitones (all the white and black notes
on the keyboard from middle c to the c above it, for example), as
opposed to the diatonic major and minor scales. Chromatic chords
employ notes foreign to the diatonic scale of the prevailing key in a
musical passage. The history of Western Music through the early 20th
century reveals a progression of increasing chromaticism.
Coda. [koh-dah] (Italian) "Tail." The last section of a piece of
music.
Consonance. The simultaneous sounding of two or more tones which
produce an effect of stability or harmoniousness. Exactly which
combinations of tones are considered consonant varies considerably
among different cultures and has changed considerably during the
history of Western music. Definitions of consonance may also be found
in acoustical theories from Pythagoras to Helmholtz. Intervals (the
distance from one note to another] considered consonant in the common
practice of tonal music are unisons, octaves, perfect fifths and
fourths, and both major and minor sixths.
Counterpoint. The art of combining two or more musical lines that are
to be played or sung simultaneously. These lines may be said to be "in
counterpoint" with each other. The term is in some ways synonymous
with polyphony, although counterpoint is most commonly used for
Baroque music; polyphony for music from the Medieval and Renaissance
periods. The rules of counterpoint were codified from the music of
Palestrina by J.J. Fux in his 1725 treatise, Gradus ad Parnassum
(Steps to Parnassus).
Crescendo. [kreh-shen-doh] (Italian) "Growing." Indicates a gradual
increase in volume. May be indicated by a symbol called a
"hairpin" (<) or abbreviated as "cresc."
Diatonic. Any octave divided into a seven-note scale (consisting of
various combinations of whole tones and semitones). The major and
minor scales, as well as the church modes, are diatonic. Diatonic
harmony, which is the basis for our tonal system, consists of chords
which contain only the notes of a given diatonic scale. (See
chromatic.)
Diminuendo. [deh-meen-yoo-ehn-doh] (Italian) "Diminishing." Indicates
a gradual decrease in volume. Synonymous with decrescendo. May be
indicated by a symbol called a "hairpin" (>) or abbreviated as "dim."
Dissonance. The sounding of two or more tones which produce an effect
of harshness or instability, and demand "resolution" to a consonance.
Like consonance, the concept of dissonance is dependent upon both
context and the way our ears have been cultured. Some intervals
considered dissonant in the Medieval period were found to be consonant
during the Renaissance. Also, the way a dissonance is resolved (and
even the way it is orchestrated) can decrease or intensify how "harsh"
it sounds. Intervals commonly considered dissonant in tonal music are
the major and minor seconds and sevenths.
Drone. A sustained musical sound, usually a bass note or notes. Also,
an instrument or part of an instrument that produces such sounds can
be called a drone, such as the drones of a bagpipe.
Dynamics. The degrees of volume (loudness and softness) in music. Also
the words, abbreviations, and symbols used to indicate degrees of
volume. Piano (soft) and forte (loud) are most common.
Harmony. Harmony is the chordal or vertical structure of a piece of
music, as opposed to melody (and polyphony, or multiple melodies)
which represents the horizontal structure. The succession of chords in
a given piece is referred to as a chord progression.
Homophony (homophonic). From the Greek for "like-sounding." Music in
which all voices move in the same rhythm. Or, more commonly, a musical
texture in which there is a clear distinction between melody and a
chordal [chord] accompaniment. (See polyphony.)
Imitation. The overlapping repetition of a melody by two or more
"voices." A technique of polyphonic composition.
Key. A musical work in a "key" is melodically and harmonically
orientated around a particular major or minor scale. For example, a
composition in C Major will usually begin and end in that key,
although excursions to other keys may occur. However, a passage in C
Major may temporarily utilize notes that do not occur in that scale
and still remain in C Major.
Key signature. The key signature is a symbol found at the beginning of
a musical composition; sharps or flats are placed on the staff as
needed to indicate the key of the piece.
Largo. [lahr-goh] (Italian) "Broad." Indicates a very slow tempo,
usually slower than adagio.
Legato. [leh-gah-toh] (Italian) "Tied." An indication to play music in
a connected, smooth fashion.
Libretto. [lih-breh-toh] (Italian) "Little book." The text of an
opera, oratorio, or other large-scale vocal work.
Measure. Synonymous with bar.
Meter. The organization of beats, establishing an underlying pattern
of emphases and creating a regular, measurable "pulse." A waltz for
example, is in a triple meter, with an emphasis on the first beat of
the three: 1-2-3, 1-2-3. A time signature placed at the beginning of a
composition or section indicates the basic unit of measurement
contained within each measure. A waltz is usually notated in three-
quarter (3/4) time, for example, which tells the performer that each
measure will contain three quarter notes to be played as fast as the
tempo indicates. The first beat of a group is generally emphasized. A
beat should not be confused with a note; a beat may contain one note,
many notes, or may be silent (indicated by a symbol called a rest).
Beats create an underlying pulse that organizes musical sounds through
time.
Mode. In the broadest meaning, any arrangement of musical tones into a
scale. The major and minor scales can be called modes. Mode most often
refers to the scales used in Western music from about 400 to 1500
which were identified by Greek names: Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian,
Mixolydian. These are sometimes called the "church modes," because of
their associations with Gregorian Chant. Two subsequent additions to
this old modal system, Ionian and Aeolian, were identical to the major
and minor scales known today. By 1600 these were the only two modes
commonly used by classical composers, but the other modes continued to
be heard in folk traditions. The church modes were rediscovered by
composers of the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries ; the modes
also play in important role in jazz composition.
Modulation. Changing key within the course of a composition.
Monophony (monophonic). From the Greek for "one-sounding." Music for a
single voice or part; a melody without any accompaniment. Gregorian
chant is an example of monophony.
Motive. A recurring, recognizable rhythmic, melodic, or harmonic idea.
A motive may also be a part of a larger phrase, theme, or melody.
Ornament. An embellishment to a pre-existing melodic line, generally
consisting of a single note, or small group of notes. At various times
musical history the use of ornaments has been left up to the
discretion of the performer, indicated either by a system of symbolic
shorthand, or written out as notes.
Ostinato. [oh-steh-nah-toh] (Italian) "Obstinate." A musical pattern
repeated many times, one after another. The pattern may be melodic,
harmonic, or rhythmic. A melodic ostinato repeated in the bass is
called a ground bass.
Part. 1. The line or lines of music read by an individual performer or
multiple performers of the same instrument. For example, the viola
section of an orchestra consists of a group of violists reading the
same music, known as the"viola part." 2. A single melodic strand of a
polyphonic or contrapuntal texture, as in "two-part counterpoint" and
"four-part harmony." In this context, "voice" can also be used to mean
"part." 3. A section of a larger composition, used primarily to
describe a musical form, for example "three-part song form."
Phrase. A sub-section of a melodic line, generally longer than a
motive, and comparable to a clause or sentence within a paragraph of
written prose. Melodies and themes may be constructed out of several
phrases of equal or varied length.
Pizzicato. [pih-tzee-kah-toh] (Italian) "Plucked." An indication to
pluck (with the fingers) the string or strings of an instrument which
is usually bowed.
Polyphony (polyphonic). From the Greek for "many-sounding." Music in
which two or more "voices" are heard simultaneously; as opposed to
monophonic ("one-sounding") and homophonic ("like-sounding"). See
counterpoint.
Recitative. [reh-sih-tah-teev] From the Italian "recitativo." A
declamatory style of singing designed to imitate the natural
inflections of speech. It was developed by a group of Florentine
intellectuals (c.1600) in an attempt to recreate the performance style
of ancient Greek tragedy, and became an essential feature of operas
and oratorios. In early Baroque operas, [cons/genres] the distinction
between recitative and aria was often blurred; by the late Baroque (c.
1700) the two were completely distinct in style and purpose, with
recitative used to propel the plot and aria used for poetic
reflection. In the Romantic period the lines between the two forms
began to blur again. Baroque and Classical opera featured two types of
recitative: recitativo secco ("dry recitative") featuring quick
articulation of the text, accompanied by harpsichord; and recitativo
accompagnato ("accompanied recitative"), more dramatic and melodic,
accompanied by the full orchestra
Rubato. [roo-bah-toh] (Italian) "Robbed." Also tempo rubato ("robbed
time"). The practice of performing music in a flexible, instead of
strict tempo. Rubato is one of the more controversial issues in
musical performance, as its precise manner of execution cannot be
precisely notated. However, the "appropriate" application of rubato is
often considered to be a sign of the "musicality" of a performer. What
sounds like "musical" rubato to one listener may sound overdone and
distorted by another.
Staccato. [stah-kah-toh] (Italian) "Separated." Notes which are held
for less than their written value, or "separated" from one another.
There are various degrees of staccato, and it can be notated in
various ways; the most common has a dot placed over or under the note.
Notes written to be played staccato are often played in a pointed or
spiky manner.
Syncopation. An alteration of the expected rhythmic emphases: for
example, accenting a weak (instead of a strong) beat, or replacing
strong beats with a rest (silence). Syncopations disturb the regular,
predictable pattern of strong and weak beats. (See meter.)
Tempo. [tehm-poh] (Italian) "Time." The rate of speed at which a
musical composition is performed. Tempo is indicated by a tempo
marking (usually in Italian), which describes the general speed (and
often the mood) of a piece or section. Allegro, andante and adagio are
common tempo markings.
Theme. A musical idea on which all or part of a work may be based. The
theme is usually a melody or melodic fragment. A single theme may be
used as the basis for a set of variations. Most music is made up of at
least several different themes.
Timbre. [tam-bruh] Synonymous with tone color. The acoustical
properties of a specific instrument or voice which contribute to its
distinctive sound. For example, a flute has a different timbre than a
clarinet.
Tonality. Denotes the presence of a central key in a musical
composition. If the music moves to a different key (see modulation),
it is expected to return to the original key (called the tonic).
Tonality gives the ear a "center," providing a context in which melody
and harmony have "meaning." Atonality (prevalent in some 20th century
music) is music without any central key.
Tone. 1. Any stable sound; synonymous with pitch. 2. A quality of
sound, dependent in many ways on personal taste. For example, a person
may find a particular singer's tone to be beautiful, another may find
that same singer's tone to be unpleasant. 3. The mood of a musical
composition, similar to the use of the term in descriptions of
literature.
Trio. 1. A piece of music for three musicians (instrumentalists or
singers). 2. A contrasting middle section of a minuet, scherzo, or
similar piece.
Vibrato. [vih-brah-toh] (Italian) "vibrated." A slight fluctuation of
pitch on a sustained tone. String players produce vibrato by wiggling
the left hand back and forth (the right hand holds the bow); wind
players and singers use breath control. Judicious use of vibrato is
considered to be expressive. Excessive vibrato produces what is often
described euphamistically as a wobble.
Vivace. [vih-vah-chay] (Italian) "full of life," "flourishing,"
"vivacious." More an indication of mood than of tempo. It was often
used to modify a tempo indication, such as Allegro vivace ("Fast and
vivacious").
and then pick up a copy of the Harvard Dictionary of Music....
----You forgot my favorite, "appoggiatura".....
Marco Brancalion
2010-01-09 21:36:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Toby Gray
A capella. [ah kah-peh-lah] (Italian) Literally, "in the chapel."
Really, it's "a cappella", with double p.

(I'm italian ;) )
--
Marco Brancalion
Misifus
2010-01-10 22:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marco Brancalion
Post by Toby Gray
A capella. [ah kah-peh-lah] (Italian) Literally, "in the chapel."
Really, it's "a cappella", with double p.
(I'm italian ;) )
Perversely, in English, that expression is spelled a half-dozen
different ways, with none specified as "Correct".

-Raf (I'm willing to go with the Italian)
--
Misifus-
Rafael Seibert
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rafiii
home: http://www.rafandsioux.com
RichL
2010-01-11 02:10:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Misifus
Post by Marco Brancalion
Post by Toby Gray
A capella. [ah kah-peh-lah] (Italian) Literally, "in the chapel."
Really, it's "a cappella", with double p.
(I'm italian ;) )
Perversely, in English, that expression is spelled a half-dozen
different ways, with none specified as "Correct".
-Raf (I'm willing to go with the Italian)
For what it's worth, Wikipedia uses the double 'p':
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_cappella

geoff
2010-01-05 20:21:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
OK, but the word is tossed around a lot by fellas like this, who
don't look like Latin scholars. :-)
Don't have to be a latin scholar. Has alwys been common pparlance in music
and recording.

geoff
Mike Fleming
2010-01-06 01:31:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by geoff
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
OK, but the word is tossed around a lot by fellas like this, who
don't look like Latin scholars. :-)
Don't have to be a latin scholar. Has alwys been common pparlance in music
and recording.
But its application to a job rather than an instrument (assuming that
you accept that the voice is an instrument) isn't the same thing. I
haven't seen it used to refer to the position in any UK adverts, they
always ask for vocalists or singers (I'm a vocalist - I must be, I'm
shit at singing). Youd' put "vox" on the mixing desk like you'd put
"guitar" (well, "gtr") or "bass", but the person playing the
guitar/gtr or bass isn't a guitar/gtr or bass, they're guitarists, or
gtrsts, or bassists.

In short, I would completely sympathise with Joe's point if I'd ever
encountered such an advert.
--
Mike Fleming
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-06 18:28:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Fleming
Post by geoff
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
OK, but the word is tossed around a lot by fellas like this, who
don't look like Latin scholars. :-)
Don't have to be a latin scholar. Has alwys been common pparlance in music
and recording.
But its application to a job rather than an instrument (assuming that
you accept that the voice is an instrument) isn't the same thing. I
haven't seen it used to refer to the position in any UK adverts, they
always ask for vocalists or singers (I'm a vocalist - I must be, I'm
shit at singing). Youd' put "vox" on the mixing desk like you'd put
"guitar" (well, "gtr") or "bass", but the person playing the
guitar/gtr or bass isn't a guitar/gtr or bass, they're guitarists, or
gtrsts, or bassists.
In short, I would completely sympathise with Joe's point if I'd ever
encountered such an advert.
--
Mike Fleming
I'd still answer the ad if it was useful, but I'd be on the lookout for
other affectations. You can never have enough comedy in your life.
suds mcduff
2010-01-06 22:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Benj
Post by handgunner
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
I think Bono did it.
Oh man! I don't know which is worse. Uneducated "educated" libs like
JoeSpare or Cretin wingers like handgunner. :)
Boys, the word is Latin. It means "voice". It's been used in music
like, well, since the Roman Empire. Probably the most commonly known
usage is "vox humana" for a certain organ stop (which actually doesn't
much sound like a human voice). One utility of "vox" as someone
pointed out is that it only takes three letters.
OK?
----Thanks alot, elitist.... ;^ )
Benj
2010-01-07 07:48:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Benj
Boys, the word is Latin. It means "voice". It's been used in music
like, well, since the Roman Empire. Probably the most commonly known
usage is "vox humana" for a certain organ stop (which actually doesn't
much sound like a human voice).  One utility of "vox" as someone
pointed out is that it only takes three letters.
OK?
----Thanks alot, elitist....  ;^ )
Hey Suds. We of the Empire don't take kindly to criticism. Perhaps a
taste of a Gladius where the sun don't shine will bring you around...

[And here I thought that all that time spent in those stupid high
school Latin classes was wasted!]
J Stevens
2010-01-03 20:06:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
first I saw it was more than 20 years ago in a recording studio. I've also
seen "VOC"
I see it a lot in live sound. It's easier to fit that on the fader strip.

Jay S
Richard Melville
2010-01-03 20:27:19 UTC
Permalink
I think it must have been the Romans.
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
bassman2
2010-01-03 20:40:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia

"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people

A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 20:41:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia

"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people

A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============

Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
bassman2
2010-01-03 23:16:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by bassman2
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
Yes, very much ad hoc...(ehehehehe)
Les Cargill
2010-01-03 23:45:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.

--
Les Cargill
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 23:47:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you. Is this your band?

http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245

This is mine:

http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
Les Cargill
2010-01-04 00:36:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you.
Yes. Yes, it was me. I did it, and I'm glad! HAHAHAHA!
(holds cigarette holder off to the side. Y'know, like
Tallulah Bankhead ).

Is this your band?
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245
Man, I wish. I tried out with those guys. They said my hair
was all wrong.

My hair was eerily like the second guy from the right
in this picture:
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=263

I don't think there was anything wrong with it.
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
As long as you didn't end up sterile, those jumpsuits R00LED!

--
Les Cargill
Tim
2010-01-04 03:08:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you. Is this your band?
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
In this shopt, is that your drummer on the left??

http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=267
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-04 03:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you. Is this your band?
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
In this shopt, is that your drummer on the left??

http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=267

============


That information will be provided strictly on a need to know basis.

(Thank you, William Casey)
Tim
2010-01-04 03:34:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you. Is this your band?
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
In this shot, is that your drummer on the left??
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=267
============
That information will be provided strictly on a need to know basis.
(Thank you, William Casey)
Actually, my dyslexia kicked in. Look again at the guy on the RIGHT.
suds mcduff
2010-01-06 22:32:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by bassman2
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Indeed...according to Wikipedia
"Etymology
From Latin, literally voice of the people
A related expression is "Vox populi vox Dei" meaning the voice of the
people is the voice of God. It refers to the idea that the king or the
government ought to pay attention to the voice of the people." - Not
sure the latter statement works, these days...
============
Yes, but the common usage is odd, considering the faddish nature of the
community using the word.
I got it from how it was spelled on the channel
strip on a recording (or live) console. YMMV. Three letters
is easier than six.
--
Les Cargill
So it was you. Is this your band?
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=245
http://www.rockandrollconfidential.com/hall/hall_detail.php?dd_keyid=254
----Nice boa.....
Tim
2010-01-04 03:12:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
Les Cargill
2010-01-04 05:05:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
What have the Ramones ever done for us?

--
Les Cargill
sln
2010-01-04 07:06:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Les Cargill
Post by Tim
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
What have the Ramones ever done for us?
They taught us all the proper way of counting off on their Greatest Hits
Live CD. Classic.

sln
--
======================================================================
Mr. Shannon Nelson Parents can't afford to be squeamish.
sln - at - onemain dot com
Tim
2010-01-05 17:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Les Cargill
Post by Tim
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
What have the Ramones ever done for us?
--
Les Cargill
Showed the world how to die young?
Les Cargill
2010-01-06 00:36:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Les Cargill
Post by Tim
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
What have the Ramones ever done for us?
--
Les Cargill
Showed the world how to die young?
In the off chance you've never seen "Life Of Brian"...



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Les Cargill
Mike Fleming
2010-01-06 01:36:27 UTC
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In article
Post by Tim
Post by Les Cargill
Post by Tim
Post by Richard Melville
I think it must have been the Romans.
Or maybe "The Ramones"
What have the Ramones ever done for us?
Showed the world how to die young?
Hendrix did it earlier and younger. That's real talent.
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Mike Fleming
Les Cargill
2010-01-03 23:43:45 UTC
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Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
The Romans.


ROMANES EUNT DOMUS.

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Les Cargill
JoeSpareBedroom
2010-01-03 23:45:45 UTC
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Post by Les Cargill
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads.
Who started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
The Romans.
ROMANES EUNT DOMUS.
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Les Cargill
Is this the Department of Redundancy Department, or what?
Les Cargill
2010-01-04 00:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
Post by Les Cargill
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads.
Who started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
The Romans.
ROMANES EUNT DOMUS.
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Les Cargill
Is this the Department of Redundancy Department, or what?
What?

--
Les Cargill
Derek Tearne
2010-01-04 03:18:02 UTC
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Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad?
It's been used that way in ads of this kind since the days last century
when they were paper and pinned up on music shop notice boards.

This is not a new fad.

--- Derek
--
Derek Tearne - ***@url.co.nz
Vitamin S - improvisation from Aotearoa/New Zealand
http://www.vitamin-s.co.nz/
Misifus
2010-01-04 05:17:57 UTC
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Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
About two thousand years ago, folks were speaking this language called
"Latin". In Latin, "vox" means "voice". There've been organ pipes
called "Vox Humana" for about three hundred years. So, it's not new.

-Raf
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Misifus-
Rafael Seibert
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rafiii
home: http://www.rafandsioux.com
haligonab
2010-01-06 01:20:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 14:46:04 -0500, "JoeSpareBedroom"
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
The Romans.
OscartheGrouch
2010-01-06 03:06:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeSpareBedroom
I keep seeing "vox" instead of "voice" or "vocalist" in craigslist ads. Who
started this fad? Seems similar to the tYpINg lIkE tHis trend, or the
assorted spastic things done with the hands by rappers, metal fans, and
drunk people in bar snapshots.
It was TV's Dick Van Patten from "Eight is Enough" fame.
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