(too old to reply)
Strings?
Pt
2013-07-18 20:39:20 UTC
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
(Gauge 105)

Pt
Brian Running
2013-07-18 21:33:45 UTC
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
I tried them once. Expensive, very soft, rubbery feel. The soft
rubberiness is something you could adjust to, if there were some reward
for doing so - but there isn't. The sound wasn't anything special, so I
had no incentive to adjust to the strings. They had one other unusual
feature - the windings on the A and E strings separate very slightly
when under tension, leaving a tiny gap between windings. The edges of
the windings are very sharp, and that tiny gap is big enough so that
when you slide your fingers, the strings are "catchy." The effect is
like a file, carving a little slot in your fingertips when you slide. I
didn't care for them, so I took them off and offered them to anyone who
wanted them here in a.g.b. Sent them, free of any cost, to an a.g.b.er
who, after receiving them, accused me of sending him something other
than T-I Jazz Flats. He even called me on the phone and grilled me
about it. So I refunded him the zero dollars he paid me for them, and
that, friends and neighbors, was the end of my T-I experiment.

So, I recommend not trying them, but if you do and then don't like them,
I recommend not giving them away for free to another player. Live and
learn.
Pt
2013-07-19 00:24:08 UTC
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
I tried them once. Expensive, very soft, rubbery feel. The soft
rubberiness is something you could adjust to, if there were some reward
for doing so - but there isn't. The sound wasn't anything special, so I
had no incentive to adjust to the strings. They had one other unusual
feature - the windings on the A and E strings separate very slightly
when under tension, leaving a tiny gap between windings. The edges of
the windings are very sharp, and that tiny gap is big enough so that
when you slide your fingers, the strings are "catchy." The effect is
like a file, carving a little slot in your fingertips when you slide. I
didn't care for them, so I took them off and offered them to anyone who
wanted them here in a.g.b. Sent them, free of any cost, to an a.g.b.er
who, after receiving them, accused me of sending him something other
than T-I Jazz Flats. He even called me on the phone and grilled me
about it. So I refunded him the zero dollars he paid me for them, and
that, friends and neighbors, was the end of my T-I experiment.
So, I recommend not trying them, but if you do and then don't like them,
I recommend not giving them away for free to another player. Live and
learn.
What do you suggest?

Pt
Jay S
2013-07-19 01:59:24 UTC
"Pt" wrote in message news:59471198-d56c-45ba-af3d-***@googlegroups.com...

After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change
strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string
bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
(Gauge 105)

Pt

I use Elixir stainless on almost everything now except basses that I use
flats on.
One of my basses I put Thomastik flats on because everyone raves how great
they are.
The only reason they remain on that bass is because of how much they cost.
They are rubbery. The tone is more of a dull thud than I like out of flats.
They also have a sticky feel to them. I don't glide up the neck as smoothly
as I'd like.

Quite frankly I don't see what anyone sees in them.

I guess in your case the question is what are you looking for? Is that bass
particularly bright?

Jay S
e***@yahoo.com
2013-07-19 13:39:38 UTC
Post by Pt
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
I tried them once. Expensive, very soft, rubbery feel. The soft
rubberiness is something you could adjust to, if there were some reward
for doing so - but there isn't. The sound wasn't anything special, so I
had no incentive to adjust to the strings. They had one other unusual
feature - the windings on the A and E strings separate very slightly
when under tension, leaving a tiny gap between windings. The edges of
the windings are very sharp, and that tiny gap is big enough so that
when you slide your fingers, the strings are "catchy." The effect is
like a file, carving a little slot in your fingertips when you slide. I
didn't care for them, so I took them off and offered them to anyone who
wanted them here in a.g.b. Sent them, free of any cost, to an a.g.b.er
who, after receiving them, accused me of sending him something other
than T-I Jazz Flats. He even called me on the phone and grilled me
about it. So I refunded him the zero dollars he paid me for them, and
that, friends and neighbors, was the end of my T-I experiment.
So, I recommend not trying them, but if you do and then don't like them,
I recommend not giving them away for free to another player. Live and
learn.
What do you suggest?
Pt
RotoSounds... ed
Brian Running
2013-07-19 13:41:32 UTC
Post by Pt
What do you suggest?
For flats? GHS Precision flatwounds are what I've settled on. I advise
against D'Addario Chromes, they are too dull and thuddy. No character
at all.

Other than that, I recommend trying as many as your budget will allow.
You'll find a favorite.
Pt
2013-07-19 15:05:01 UTC
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
What do you suggest?
For flats? GHS Precision flatwounds are what I've settled on. I advise
against D'Addario Chromes, they are too dull and thuddy. No character
at all.
Other than that, I recommend trying as many as your budget will allow.
You'll find a favorite.
I have been thinking about Pyramid Gold flatwound.
What do you think of them?
The one thing I don't want is thuddy strings but I don't want too bright either.

Pt
Pt
2013-07-19 15:06:07 UTC
Post by e***@yahoo.com
Post by Pt
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
I tried them once. Expensive, very soft, rubbery feel. The soft
rubberiness is something you could adjust to, if there were some reward
for doing so - but there isn't. The sound wasn't anything special, so I
had no incentive to adjust to the strings. They had one other unusual
feature - the windings on the A and E strings separate very slightly
when under tension, leaving a tiny gap between windings. The edges of
the windings are very sharp, and that tiny gap is big enough so that
when you slide your fingers, the strings are "catchy." The effect is
like a file, carving a little slot in your fingertips when you slide. I
didn't care for them, so I took them off and offered them to anyone who
wanted them here in a.g.b. Sent them, free of any cost, to an a.g.b.er
who, after receiving them, accused me of sending him something other
than T-I Jazz Flats. He even called me on the phone and grilled me
about it. So I refunded him the zero dollars he paid me for them, and
that, friends and neighbors, was the end of my T-I experiment.
So, I recommend not trying them, but if you do and then don't like them,
I recommend not giving them away for free to another player. Live and
learn.
What do you suggest?
Pt
RotoSounds... ed
Which ones?
I want flatwounds.

Pt
Brian Running
2013-07-19 15:36:21 UTC
Post by Pt
I have been thinking about Pyramid Gold flatwound.
What do you think of them?
The one thing I don't want is thuddy strings but I don't want too bright either.
I've never used them. I see they're $72 a set at Juststrings.com, so if
you want to plunk for them and give a report, knock 'em dead.

A 45-105 set of GHS Precision flats is $21 at Juststrings, you might
want to give them a whirl first. To my ears, they have the right
balance of brightness. Fender flats are nice, too, and are not expensive.

There are so many brands and types of strings out there at prices that
allow you to try lots of them and see what you like, I just can't see
paying $72, or even $50, for that matter.
e***@yahoo.com
2013-07-19 16:30:06 UTC
Post by Pt
Post by e***@yahoo.com
Post by Pt
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
I tried them once. Expensive, very soft, rubbery feel. The soft
rubberiness is something you could adjust to, if there were some reward
for doing so - but there isn't. The sound wasn't anything special, so I
had no incentive to adjust to the strings. They had one other unusual
feature - the windings on the A and E strings separate very slightly
when under tension, leaving a tiny gap between windings. The edges of
the windings are very sharp, and that tiny gap is big enough so that
when you slide your fingers, the strings are "catchy." The effect is
like a file, carving a little slot in your fingertips when you slide. I
didn't care for them, so I took them off and offered them to anyone who
wanted them here in a.g.b. Sent them, free of any cost, to an a.g.b.er
who, after receiving them, accused me of sending him something other
than T-I Jazz Flats. He even called me on the phone and grilled me
about it. So I refunded him the zero dollars he paid me for them, and
that, friends and neighbors, was the end of my T-I experiment.
So, I recommend not trying them, but if you do and then don't like them,
I recommend not giving them away for free to another player. Live and
learn.
What do you suggest?
Pt
RotoSounds... ed
Which ones?
I want flatwounds.
Pt
No that's not allowed... : ' ) ....e
klaw
2013-07-19 16:46:44 UTC
Post by Pt
After several years using DR and Rotosound strings it's time to change strings on my Alvarez, 4 string, active with bubinga top.
I have Elixir stainless on my Stingray and they are OK but nothing special.
I am considering Thomas Infield (Thomastik) Jazz flats on my active 4 string bass.
Has anybody here used them?
What do you think?
(Gauge 105)
Pt
my jazz came with flats so I assume fenders. they were real nice. I kept them on there for a couple three years. replaced with half rounds for more edge.
I put rotosound flats on a beatle bass I had for a while and they were very nice also. no thud with a nice bouncy punch.
RichL
2013-07-19 23:20:21 UTC
Post by Pt
Post by Brian Running
Post by Pt
What do you suggest?
For flats? GHS Precision flatwounds are what I've settled on. I advise
against D'Addario Chromes, they are too dull and thuddy. No character
at all.
Other than that, I recommend trying as many as your budget will allow.
You'll find a favorite.
I have been thinking about Pyramid Gold flatwound.
What do you think of them?
The one thing I don't want is thuddy strings but I don't want too bright either.
I've never tried Pyramid Gold bass strings. However, I did buy a set of
Pyramid Gold strings for a 12-string guitar (my Ric 360). Never again.
They didn't sound as good as the Rickenbacker set I had been using, and the
octave-separated string pairs didn't intonate properly with respect to each
other (i.e., I couldn't find a saddle position that would correctly intonate
both). On top of all that, they're overpriced.

I see their bass strings are pretty expensive too. I'd be cautious.
Sam Wilson
2013-07-22 13:58:12 UTC
Post by Pt
Post by e***@yahoo.com
RotoSounds... ed
Which ones?
I want flatwounds.
I have Rotosound flats on my 5-string fretless (I put them on when I
defretted it just because they were reasonably cheap). The Dean
5-string that a friend has lent me has D'Addario half-wounds on it which
feel much nicer, but don't sound so good. I suspect the difference in
sound is due to the pickups rather than the strings, since the
half-wounds sound good acoustically, just not very exciting plugged in.
I'm thinking of putting some of the D'Addys on my own bass - comments,
anyone?

Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
klaw
2013-07-22 18:58:42 UTC
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Pt
Post by e***@yahoo.com
RotoSounds... ed
Which ones?
I want flatwounds.
I have Rotosound flats on my 5-string fretless (I put them on when I
defretted it just because they were reasonably cheap). The Dean
5-string that a friend has lent me has D'Addario half-wounds on it which
feel much nicer, but don't sound so good. I suspect the difference in
sound is due to the pickups rather than the strings, since the
half-wounds sound good acoustically, just not very exciting plugged in.
I'm thinking of putting some of the D'Addys on my own bass - comments,
anyone?
Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
as I've mentioned - they sharpened up my fretless jazz.
Sam Wilson
2013-07-29 17:01:42 UTC
Post by klaw
Post by Sam Wilson
I'm thinking of putting some of the D'Addys on my own bass - comments,
anyone?
as I've mentioned - they sharpened up my fretless jazz.
I forgot to say thank you - thank you!

Sam
--
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in
Scotland, with registration number SC005336.
benj
2013-07-30 00:31:19 UTC
Post by Sam Wilson
I have Rotosound flats on my 5-string fretless (I put them on when I
defretted it just because they were reasonably cheap). The Dean
5-string that a friend has lent me has D'Addario half-wounds on it which
feel much nicer, but don't sound so good. I suspect the difference in
sound is due to the pickups rather than the strings, since the
half-wounds sound good acoustically, just not very exciting plugged in.
I'm thinking of putting some of the D'Addys on my own bass - comments,
anyone?
D'Addy's are my "standard" string. I used the nickle rounds for bright
fretted and Half rounds for fretless. Pretty nice sounding and available
many places. I also use GHS flats and brite flats (ground wounds) which
are also nice sounding and easily available. Usually I prefer D'Addy half
rounds for fretless but sometime Brite Flats are Ok. I really like the GHS
flats which are brighter than you'd think. Work great on my Jazz or P-
bass (fretted). Usually don't use flats on fretless because I like the
added brightness of the ground wounds, but grounds still don't chew the
fingerboard.
Pt
2013-07-31 02:57:55 UTC
I have decided what strings I want to try.
Ghs pressure wounds 106's, long scale.
My bass has a 35 inch scale, hope they fit but they are advertised to fit up to 36 inch scale basses.
I just ordered them online and will post what I think of them when I get them.

Pt
benj
2013-07-31 03:24:27 UTC
Post by Pt
I have decided what strings I want to try.
Ghs pressure wounds 106's, long scale.
My bass has a 35 inch scale, hope they fit but they are advertised to
fit up to 36 inch scale basses.
I just ordered them online and will post what I think of them when I get them.
Pt
I like those too. I have them on my Ken Smith (fretted) and also on one
of my SX fretless basses. They sound better than ground wounds (brighter)
on fretless but DO chew a fingerboard, though not as much as rounds do.
So I only put them on a low usage fretless. On the Smith I really like
them and the primary reason is that rounds alway give you that zip-zip
finger noise that I hate. The pressure wounds sound good, but greatly
reduce that zippy sound and I like the smoother feel of the strings.

Yeah, let us know what you think of them.

Ps. I never noticed they are supposed to fit extra long scale. That is
interesting. My Modulus is 35" scale and I've been buying extra long
scale D'Addarios for it online.
Pt
2013-07-31 11:51:29 UTC
Post by benj
Ps. I never noticed they are supposed to fit extra long scale. That is
interesting. My Modulus is 35" scale and I've been buying extra long
scale D'Addarios for it online.
GHS Pressurewound bass strings, set no. M7200. Long scale plus (Fits 34, 35 and 36" scales), medium gauge 44-106. New in package. To find your string length, measure from the nut to the ball end of the string at the bridge.

Pt
benj
2013-07-31 21:44:30 UTC
Post by Pt
Post by benj
Ps. I never noticed they are supposed to fit extra long scale. That is
interesting. My Modulus is 35" scale and I've been buying extra long
scale D'Addarios for it online.
GHS Pressurewound bass strings, set no. M7200. Long scale plus (Fits
34, 35 and 36" scales), medium gauge 44-106. New in package. To find
your string length, measure from the nut to the ball end of the string
at the bridge.
Pt
That's interesting! What they call "scale length is from the nut to ball
end of string! Hence, it seems that in their eyes all the basses we call
34" (nut to saddles) are 35" to them or even 36" depending if it's
through-body or not.

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